• Hundreds of treasure hunters have scoured the Catskills around Phoenicia, looking for the millions that Prohibition-era gangster Dutch Schultz is said to have stashed somewhere underground. This book tells the story of Schultz, who for a time was the most powerful gangster in America, and of the treasure he is believed to have hidden near Phoenicia before meeting his violent end in a Newark tavern on October 23, 1935.  His dying words, recorded by a police stenographer, give tantalizing clues to the location of his vast fortune. The book was also featured on Fox Cable's "Million Dollar Mysteries."
  • A succinct illustrated history of the cauliflower growing industry in the Catskills, once considered to produce the finest cauliflower to be found.
  • This history describes not only the Erie Canal but the many others which made up New York’s 524-mile network of canals that still exists in the state. These include the lateral canals that connected New York’s northern and southern tiers to the all-important Erie, the corporate canals such as the 1828 Delaware and Hudson Canal that served the coal industry, and others.
  • A succinct biography for young readers of the life and heroism of a sixteen-year old girl who rode through the Hudson Valley to call out her father’s troops to repel British attack during the Revolutionary War.  V.T. Dacquino tells of his sleuth work uncovering her authentic story.
  • Along the northern edge of broad fertile plains of the Schoharie Valley south of Middleburgh abruptly rises a unique natural mountain upon which one’s eye cannot help but focus.  This is the famed Vrooman’s Nose, named for the Dutch pioneer from Schenectady who bought land including this mountain in 1712.  Scientist and historian Vincent J. Schaefer traces the story of this prominent Schoharie Valley landmark from its shaping by the great continental glacier to its preservation by a dedicated community and the direct descendants of Adam Vrooman (b. 1649).
  • From 1833 to 1878, the Chemung Canal served as one of the lateral canals in New York State, capitalizing on the wildly successful Erie Canal that had opened in 1825. The Chemung Canal connected the Chemung River in Elmira, New York, to Seneca Lake at Watkins Glen, New York.
  • Essays on defining aspects of the Catskills as set down by the incomparable Norman Van Valkenburg, author of the popular  Murder in the Catskills and other mysteries starring surveyor-sleuth Ward Eastman.
  • This is an addendum of supplemental and updated material for Volume 4 of this series, Where Did the Tracks Go in the Catskills? It contains 31 new maps and detailed text for cattle passes, charcoal kilns, quarries, logging lines and other industries, as well as emergences from reservoirs, construction, and relocations.
  • A history of the creation of the Ashokan Reservoir from 1905 inception to 1917 completion and what it involved: the emptying, damming and inundation of the inhabited valley to bring pure water to New York City.
  • "This illustrated history of the Seven Years War fought in North America is an excellent primer for any student of eighteenth century military history.  It concisely tells the story of conflict in the wilderness and how the colonists of New France and New England, reinforced by regulars from their mother countries and with their respective Indian allies, made war North American-style."  -- Lt. Colonel Ian McCullough, Canadian Forces Former Commanding Officer, The Black Watch Regiment of Canada.
  • A history of the Catskill Mountains by a lifelong resident and accomplished poet, author and historian who colorfully delineates not only the fascinating history of settlement and development but also the personalities, ordinary or eccentric, who have etched their own histories indelibly on the mountains.

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